Negotiating Ethnicities in China and Taiwan

Negotiating Ethnicities in China and Taiwan

(CRM 46)

Melissa J. Brown, ed.

Publication date: 1996
ISBN-13 (print): 978-1-55729-048-9
ISBN-10 (print): 1-55729-048-2

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These essays address related facets of the shifting and fluid process of negotiation that is the real nature of ethnic relations in China, past and present, and by extension in the rest of the world. The volume concerns itself both with the overarching identity, first cultural and then national, that we now call "Chinese" and with its constituent ethnicites, including both the majority, which we now call "Han," and various minority or peripheral identities.

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Title information

These essays address related facets of the shifting and fluid process of negotiation that is the real nature of ethnic relations in China, past and present, and by extension in the rest of the world. The volume concerns itself both with the overarching identity, first cultural and then national, that we now call "Chinese" and with its constituent ethnicites, including both the majority, which we now call "Han," and various minority or peripheral identities. 

Contributors:
Stevan Harrell
Patricia Ebrey
Melissa J. Brown
Hai Ren
Janet L. Upton
Almaz Khan
Wurlig Borchigud
Keng-Fong Pang
Emily Chao
Siu-woo Cheung

 

Pages: 335
Language: English
Publisher: Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley
OCLC: 32347745

Melissa J. Brown, ed.

Melissa J. Brown is currently a research affiliate at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University, and editor of the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies.

Education: B.A. Stanford University, M.A. Stanford University, Ph.D. University of Washington
Website:

Negotiating Ethnicities in China and Taiwan

Foreword – vii
Thomas B. Gold

Preface – ix

Introduction – 1
Stevan Harrell
1. Surnames and Han Chinese Identity – 11
    Patricia Ebrey
2. On Becoming Chinese – 37
    Melissa J. Brown
3. Taiwan and the Impossibility of the Chinese – 75
    Hai Ren
4. Home on the Grasslands? Tradition, Modernity, and the Negotiation of Identity by Tibetan Intellectuals in the PRC – 98
    Janet L. Upton
5. Who are the Mongols? State, Ethnicity, and the Politics of Representation in the PRC – 125
    Almaz Khan
6. Transgressing Ethnic and National Boundaries: Contemporary "Inner Mongolian" Identities in China – 160
    Wurlig Borchigud
7. Being Hui, Huan-nang, and Utsat Simultaneously: Contextualizing History and Identities of the Austronesian-speaking Hainan Muslims – 183
    Keng-Fong Pang
8. Hegemony, Agency, and Re-presenting the Past: The Invention of Dongba Culture among the Naxi of Southwest China – 208
    Emily Chao
9. Representation and Negotiation of Ge Identities in Southeast Guizhou – 240
    Siu-woo Cheung
10. The Nationalities Question and the Prmi Prblem – 274
    Stevan Harrell
Character List – 297
Index – 305

JOURNAL REVIEWS

"This collection of ten essays illustrates the excitement of ongoing research in the rapidly expanding area of minorities, race, and ethnicity in East Asia as well as some of the usual difficulties of fieldwork in politically sensitive and geographically remote regions....[T]hese chapters generally provide new and stimulating material suggestive of the kind of work now being undertaken in this area of research....[T]he promising research presented here should further stimulate the scholarly examination of China's cultures and expand a discussion of the great diversity within the categories of "Han" and "Chinese” as well as among the many distinct ethnic groups now a part of the Chinese state." ~Linda Benson, Oakland University, in China Review International (http://www.jstor.org/stable/23732349)

"This publication's relevance is twofold. On the one hand it touches on the complex issue of Chineseness with all its ideological as well as political and strategic repercussions. On the other hand it documents the state of China related anthropological research, which at present is a particularily fast growing field of Chinese studies." ~Barbara Hendrischke, University of Melbourne, in Journal of Contemporary Asia (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00472339880000221)

"This is a fascinating collection of ten essays on the subject of ethnic identity construction and negotiation covering a range of different contexts in China and Taiwan....Most of the essays are well written with ethnographic details and theoretical insights tightly interwoven." ~Wing Chung Ng, University of Texas at San Antonio, in Pacific Affairs (http://www.jstor.org/stable/2760991)